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lowlife4life:

IMG_0241 by Overboosphotos on Flickr.

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lowlife4life:

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lowlife4life:

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highwaystarmanny:



Reblogging for da gif

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moustacherides:

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njborn95:

stussyking:

njborn95:

I’ve always wondered why people who whine about getting the jack under their slammed cars don’t implement a pneumatic operated jack stand system to their cars. It wouldn’t need to be too big, just something to lift the car up enough to sneak a low profile jack under it.

I don’t know why people slam their cars and then complain about how low they are.

^This too, they knew what they were getting into.

Air-Jacks are very expensive to purchase off the shelf & few people want to spend the money required to make the purchase.
Also, if you want to piece together your own kit, you will have to purchase the high pressure cylinders, fab your brackets, pick you mounting points (this requires equal balance @ all 4 corners) high pressure air lines & high pressure fittings.
By the time you piece your own kit together, paying retail for components, you will not have saved money by DIY.
Of you want to air-jack you car just high enough to fit a traditional jack underneath, then what’s the point? Shy not purchase the proper spec. Cylinder that’s gonna lift the car all the way up?
Most air jacks operate between 1200psi-4000psi
I work in the industrial sector & have access to a fluid/compressed gas power shop, so I have sub retail pricing & I can assemble myself
Air jacks are something I have been researching for a little while & I will be building my own kit.

I don’t get why they do just drive the front wheels on to a plank.